Post10 Bugs You Really Don’t Want In Your Home

Giant Leopard Moth

Giant Leopard Moth

The Giant Leopard Moth or Eyed Tiger Moth (Hypercompe scribonia) has a distinct pattern of black rings, reminiscent to those found in its namesake the leopard. The moth’s unmistakable colorings is aposematic, meaning that they are actually “advertising” the bug’s unpalatability to potential predators.

Giant Camel Spider

Giant Camel Spider

Perhaps we would never – or rarely – have heard of such a creature if it was not because of the tales and photos the United States Servicemen in the Persian Gulf War and afterwards the Iraq War carried back home. It was said that a giant camel spider crawled into the sleeping bag of a soldier, biting the man while he was asleep. Fortunately, the giant desert camel spiders native to Iraq aren’t venomous. It uses its claws to catch its prey, which is never bigger than the arachnid itself. They are also known for being fast. Giant Camel Spiders have been known to run around 10 MPH. This creature real name is Arachnid Solifugae. “Solifugae” means, in Latin, “flee from the sun”.

Giant Water Bug

Giant Water Bug

Belostomatidae is a family of insects in the Order Hemiptera, known as giant water bugs or colloquially as toe-biters. They are the largest insects in the order Hemiptera, and occur worldwide, with most of the species in North America, South America and East Asia. They are typically encountered in freshwater streams and ponds. Most species are relatively large (2 cm or more) with some of the largest, such as Lethocerus, exceeding 12 cm, and nearly reaching the dimensions (length and mass) of some of the larger beetles in the world. Giant water bugs are a popular food in Thailand.

Hercules Beetle

Hercules Beetle

The Hercules beetle (Dynastes hercules) is the most famous and largest of the rhinoceros beetles. Native to the rainforests of Central and South America, they also can be found in coastal regions of North Carolina. Their title is well deserved, with some (exceptionally rare) males reaching 6.75 inches (170 mm) in length. It is the largest of the 6 species in the Dynastes genus, and one of the largest beetles known, being exceeded in length by only two other beetles in the family Cerambycidae, Macrodontia cervicornis (specimens of 170-175 mm are known) and Titanus giganteus (several 180+ mm specimens are known to exist). However, if the horns are excluded, this species drops considerably farther down in the size rankings. One reason for this is that the development of the horns is allometric, as well as sexually dimorphic, and thus not strictly correlated to actual body size; it is possible for a female to be much longer, measured from eyes to abdomen, than a male, yet be considered “smaller” simply due to the absence of horns.

Calleta Silkmoth

Calleta Silkmoth

The Calleta Silkmoth (Eupackardia calleta) is a moth of the Saturniidae family. It is the only species in the Eupackardia genus. [1] It is found in Mexico, Guatemala and the southernmost part of the United States and their wingspan is 80-110 mm.

Cecropia Moth

Cecropia Moth

The Cecropia Moth is one of the largest moths found in North America. It is a member of the Saturniidae family, or giant silk moths. Females with a wingspan of 130 mm or more have been documented. It is found as far west as the Rocky Mountains and north into the maritime provinces of Canada. The larvae of these moths are most commonly found on Maple trees, but they have been known to feed on Wild Cherry and Birch trees among many others.

Damselfly

Damselfly

The Damselfly (Suborder Zygoptera) is an insect in the Order Odonata. Damselflies are similar to dragonflies, but the adults can be differentiated by the fact that the wings of most damselflies are held along, and parallel to, the body when at rest. Furthermore, the hindwing of the damselfly is essentially similar to the forewing, while the hindwing of the dragonfly broadens near the base, caudal to the connecting point at the body. Damselflies are also usually smaller, weaker fliers than dragonflies, and their eyes are separated.

Damselflies undergo incomplete metamorphosis, with an aquatic nymphal stage. The female lays eggs in water, sometimes in underwater vegetation, or high in trees in bromeliads and other water-filled cavities. Nymphs are carnivorous, feeding on daphnia, mosquito larvae, and various other small aquatic organisms. The gills of damselfly nymphs are large and external, resembling three fins at the end of the abdomen. After moulting several times, the winged adult emerges and eats flies, mosquitoes, and other small insects. Some of the larger tropical species are known to feed on spiders, hovering near the web and plucking the spider from its nest.

Devil’s Flower Mantis

Devil's Flower Mantis

The Idolomantis Diabolica is sometimes known as the “King of all mantids” for the obvious reason: it’s beauty, size and rarity, is one of the largest species of praying mantis that mimic flowers.

Lymantrid moth

Lymantrid moth

The Lymantrid moth (Calliteara pudibunda) is widespread in Danish beech (Fagus sylvatica) forests. The species has one generation in Denmark, with the dull grey moth flying during June. Each female can lay 300-400 eggs which she normally does very near the place where she emerged from the pupae. The small caterpillar is very hairy and can easily be transported by the wind. In late autumn the caterpillar is fully grown, is about 5 cm long and is very beautifully coloured. Pupation takes place among leaves on the ground where a silken cocoon is made.

Orchid mantis

Orchid Mantis

The Hymenopus coronatu, aka Orchid mantis, is a variety of flower mantis usually found in Malaysia and Indonesia. Doesn’t the mantis pictured look just like an orchid? They hide in the flowers they resemble, waiting for other delicious insects to alight.

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